Whats New

Aunt Ding'sWALTERVILLE: Nine years ago a woman says a building in Walterville, “Just looked at me and said ‘Buy me.’” Apparently that’s happened again.
In 2005 the Log Cabin Inn Restaurant in McKenzie Bridge had been lost to a devastating fire. “Every time we wanted to go out to dinner we had to drive clear into town,” recalls Gena Lamere. “We needed a place that did good old fashioned home cooking and I said ‘Okay.’”
This year Heather Hernandez-Reja felt a similar impulse when she learned Aunt Ding’s Restaurant was available for sale - as she was sitting at a table having dinner with her husband and children. That caused her to follow Gena outside and make her case.

Off Beat Oregon History

Drunken husbandBy Finn J.D. John

You may have heard of Henderson Luelling - the Quaker nurseryman who founded an Oregon industry when he brought a wagon full of tiny trees out on the Oregon Trail, back in 1847. His story was recently memorialized in a children’s book that won the “Oregon Reads” award for the state sesquicentennial: “Apples to Oregon,” by Deborah Hopkins.
On the trail to Oregon, many of Luelling’s fellow emigrants thought he was crazy. The care he lavished on the trees (even at the expense of his wife and nine children) was, by anyone’s lights, obsessive. But history vindicated Luelling when the few hundred surviving tree slips made him a wealthy man upon his arrival in the Willamette Valley.

Pages

Doodles By Barry McWilliams

Pages

Gardening Tips

ConiferBy Kym Pokorny
We buy live Christmas trees with the best of intentions, promising ourselves to plant them in the garden as soon as the holidays are over. But resolve has a way of fading like resolutions after January.
Moved outside without the care they need, the beautiful, and not inexpensive, trees meant to go in the ground in winter, languish, fade to brown and eventually die. One alternative is to buy plants meant to stay in pots, said Al Shay, a horticulture instructor at Oregon State University.
“It’s a trade-off,” he said. “You give up big trees for smaller, slower-growing plants that you can bring in year after year. But what’s small? Is four feet too small? Three feet? It’s relative.”

Pages

Connect with the River & the world

Don't put all

your eggs in one basket

Local ads

River Reflections’

“McKenzie Connection”

will place your ads
in print, online &
within social media

Contact us today

541-822-3358

McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.