McKenzie Recreation

Lava Lake, Old McKenzie Pass, Hwy 242, Oregon
Recreation in Oregon's McKenzie River area

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Bird Watching

Bird watching opportunities

in the McKenzie River area

Prime Time to Spot Hummingbirds in Oregon

Ruous hummingbird in OregonBy Chris Thomas, Oregon News Service

It's hard to believe summer is coming to an end, but the birds know it.
People who band hummingbirds in order to track their migration patterns say the birds already have put on weight for their long journey south - and in Oregon, August and September are the prime time to see them.
Fred Bassett, founder of Hummingbird Research, sometimes invites people to watch the banding process up close, and even lets them hold the birds.
"Now, while we have the bird, I'm going to get some measurements from it. We're going to measure the length of its wing, tail and bill. He weighs 3.1 grams. And that weight, you can stuff nine of those in an envelope and mail him for a first-class stamp."
The leg-band numbers and bird measurements are reported to the National Bird Laboratory. Sometimes, a bird is caught that's already been banded, and they come to the Northwest from as far away as the southeastern United States and Mexico. Even birds just a few weeks old already are migrating.
Hummingbirds survive primarily by eating insects, but the nectar that people put out in feeders gives them a quick energy boost that they appreciate.
Ned Batchelder, who has been banding birds for about a dozen years from Washington state to Utah, advises people not to add food coloring to hummingbird nectar, and says there's even a study under way to see if it's harmful to the birds.
"Nature's nectar is clear. You don't need the red dye. Nature's nectar is sucrose or sugar-water, so by mixing four-to-one, or three-to-one - that's four parts water, one part sugar. Not brown sugar, not honey. That's what, basically, nature's nectar is."
Batchelder says the key to attracting hummingbirds is to keep the nectar in the feeder fresh by changing it every few days. The birds are picky about what they eat and some are territorial, so putting out multiple feeders, either grouped nearby or in different spots, signals to the birds that there's enough for everybody.

Walterville Pond

Walterville Pond photo

Located near milepost 12.5 of Hwy. 126, this 70-acre pond is a storage area for the Eugene Water & Electric Board’s power canal. It has open water habitat, with willow thickets at its eastern edge. Young Douglas-fir grow on the hills to the north of the pond. Other habitats include white oak woodland, orchards and farm fields. Common winter birds include Great Blue Heron, Pied-billed and Western Grebes, Double-crested Cormorant, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Hooded and Common Mergansers, and American Coot. Canvasback and American Wigeon sometimes visit, and Barrow’s Goldeneye, Forster’s Tern and Pacific Loon have also been seen. Common summer birds include Osprey, four species of swallows, Western Wood- Pewee, House Wren, Yellow-breasted Chat, Wrentit, Black-headed Grosbeak and Common Yellowthroat.

Birds of the Walterville Canal

The Three Sisters Loop

3 Sister Loop map

This route traces portions of three National Scenic Byways - McKenzie Pass - Santiam to the north, Cascade Lakes on the eastern slope, and West Cascades - for some stunning scenery and incredible habitat diversity at nearly 50 prime birding sites. Eleven species of woodpeckers nest between the Santiam and McKenzie Passes, including Lewis’s, White-headed, and Black-backed, plus all three western sapsuckers. Cache Mountain and the Meadow Lake Basin host Blue and Ruffed Grouse and nesting Vaux’s Swift. Waterfalls and river birds abound on the Three Sisters loop with Sahalie and Koosah Falls on the Upper McKenzie River home to American Dipper, Winter Wren, and Harlequin Duck.

Don't let disease foul your bird feeder

Bird feeder image
By Denise Ruttan
Photo by Betsy Hartley
As you're welcoming wild birds into your yard this winter, be sure to keep your bird feeder clean and keep an eye on the health of your feathered diners.
"Sick birds will either be found dead or perched, often with feathers in disarray, eyes squinted or wings held out," said Dana Sanchez, a wildlife specialist with the Oregon State University Extension Service. "Healthy birds are alert and mobile, whereas sick birds stand out because they are neither of those."  
Birds can get salmonella from bird feeders. Other diseases can spread when birds congregate or land on infected perches, Sanchez said.
"If the sick bird is associated with your feeders, take down the feeders and clean them," she said. "It is probably a good idea to keep the feeders down for two to three weeks, until the disease has had a chance to run its course in the local population. Allow the bird to recover on its own. Make sure children, pets and free-ranging cats cannot get to the bird."
Sanchez offered these tips to make sure your feeders are clean and free of mold for backyard visitors.  
* Clean your feeders once a month during low-use times and up to once a week during high-use periods.
* Scrape off bird droppings and rinse or wipe clean the perches with a solution of 1 part vinegar to 20 parts water.
* Hang your feeders where the feed won’t get wet. If seed in a feeder has gotten wet and compacted, remove the feed and discard it. Then clean the feeder with warm water and a brush.
* Dry the feeder before refilling with the fresh seed.
* If your feeder’s location is likely to get wet often, only fill it with a one- to two-day supply of seed at a time.
* Clean up under feeders regularly and prevent accumulation of feed beneath the feeders by moving them occasionally. Seed on the ground can attract other animals, such as rodents, that you would prefer to not have near your home.
For more information about feeds and feeder placement, check out the Feed Wild Birds publication from the OSU Extension Service.

Cycling

Off & On Road Cycling

Mountain Biking

Mountain biking trails abound on public lands in the McKenzie River Ranger District. Remember to call their office (541-822-3381) before heading out to make sure roads and trails are open and cleared.

Here are eight areas that offer a great experience: Blue River North Trail, Box Canyon Guard Station, Box Canyon Trail, Clear Lake, French Pete Trail, Ice Cap Creek CampgroundOlallie Trail, and the Upper McKenzie Trail.

Use caution on forest roads and plan your route ahead of time.

Not all forest roads are paved or have suitable shoulders for sharing the road with cars and trucks.

Please check for local conditions or with cycling clubs for recommended routes.

Blue River North Trail Area - Buck Mountain Trail #3304, Frissel Trail #3512, Tidbits Mountain Trail #3328 / #3398

Box Canyon Trail Area - Chucksney Mountain Trail #3306, Grasshopper Mountain Trail #3569, Roaring Ridge Trail #3312

French Pete Trail Area - Indian Ridge Trail #3315

Olallie Trail Area - Castle Rock Trail #3506, Echo Trail #3309, Horsepasture Mountain Trail #4347, King-Castle Trail #4326, OLeary Mountain Trail #3321, Olallie Trail #3529

Upper McKenzie Trail Area - Clear Lake Loop Trail #3507, McKenzie River National Rec Trail #3507, Water Falls Loop Trail #3503

 

Road Cycling

Both the Aufderheide Memorial Drive and the McKenzie Pass Scenic Bikeway are not to be missed.

Aufderheide Drive sign Aufderheide Memorial Drive

This route between the McKenzie River Valley and Oakridge/Westfir is part of the much larger West Cascades Scenic Byway. It is a bike-friendly road that provides up-close views of old-growth trees in the Willamette National Forest. A key feature is the Constitution Grove, where the trees bear plaques engraved with the Founding Fathers' names. The route (also known as Forest Service Road 19) is anchored at its southern end by a bike-friendly bed and breakfast.

The Byway travels past Cougar Reservoir and claims along the Roaring River to a 3,600-foot summit at the Box Canyon Camp. It ends in the small city of Westfir, near the original headquarters for a series of lumber companies, across the street from the Office Bridge, the longest covered bridge in Oregon.

The route is rated as difficult and takes about 6 hours to ride.

 

Scenic Bikeway signMcKenzie Pass Scenic Bikeway

The 38-mile McKenzie Pass/Santiam Pass ride covers some of the most spectacular scenery Oregon. About five miles east of McKenzie Bridge, the ride begins at the junction of Hwy. 126 and Hwy. 242 and generally follows a 1860’s era wagon road (The latter was selected to be on the U.S. Register of Historic Places, in March of 2011.)

The first 25 miles climbs through steep switchbacks, like Dead Horse Grade. Riders will encounter lush Douglas-fir and red cedar forests before ascending into higher elevations where lava field limit vegetation.

This Byway boasts the highest concentration of snowcapped volcanoes (and associated glaciers) in the lower 48 states. Broken Top Mountain, Mount Washington and The Three Sisters (among other peaks) tower above the Byway.

Most of Oregon Hwy. 242 is closed during winter months, but bicycles are usually allowed in the spring before it reopens to cars, providing miles of traffic-free road riding as the snow melts. Please check www.tripcheck.com for current road closures or www.rideoregonride.com.

Restrooms and potable water can be found at the McKenzie Bridge store  and the Village Green Park in Sisters. There are restrooms at the summit and various campgrounds throughout the climb.

 

Gravel & Paved Roads

Castle Rock Road offers a nine-mile ride over paved and gravel. Open year ‘round it gains 2,100 feet before its turn-around point.

The ride starts at the Delta Old-Growth Grove parking in the Delta Campground on the north end of Aufderheide Dr. (USFS Road #19). The route goes south along Road 19 for approximately ½ mile and takes a left fork onto Road 410. After going another ½ mile take a left onto King Road (Road 2639). Go another mile to Road 480, (O'Leary Road), which travels 5.8 miles to the Castle Rock trailhead. The ride to the summit covers 1 ½ miles.

Technical Difficulty: More

Physical Difficulty: Most

 

Horse Creek Road offers a 14 mile, one-way ride over gravel and paved roads. It is rideable year ‘round.

From McKenzie Bridge, turn onto Horse Creek Road and park at the old McKenzie Ranger District Work Center parking lot, about ¼-mile from the Highway 126 intersection. Follow Horse Creek Road up a fairly gradual incline. At milepoint 4.5 the road turns to gravel and at 6 miles it starts to climb steeply for another 2.5 miles. At 9.2 miles, stay left at the intersection with USFS Road #356 and continue up Horse Creek for approximate 5 miles until it dead ends.

Technical Difficulty: Easy

Physical Difficulty: Easy

 

McKenzie River Drive travels 14 miles (sometimes alongside its namesake – connecting the communities of Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge. The ride, over both pavement and gravel, starts at the Delta Campground on Aufderheide Drive (USFS Road #19). This route can be ridden year ‘round.

From the campground, travel south on Road 19 for approximately 1/2-mile and turn left onto Road 410. Travel 1/5 mile and bear left again at King Road. After passing the Belknap covered bridge go about four miles. Then take a left onto Horse Creek Road. From there travel 1 1/2 miles to Highway 126 and turn left. Just over a mile, turn left onto McKenzie River Drive. About two miles down the road turn left onto the Belknap covered bridge and take a right to return to the Delta Campground.

Technical Difficulty: Easy

Physical Difficulty: Easy

 

Olallie Trail offers either a nine-mile, one-way route, or a 27 mile loop over both paved and single track surfaces. It is best suited to the dry season.

From McKenzie Bridge, turn right onto Horse Creek Road, travel two miles and turn right onto USFS Road #1993 (Wapiti Road). Follow Road 1993 about three miles to the lower trailhead. 6.5 miles up Road 1993 is the next trailhead. An 18.3-mile, figure 8 loop starts here. Take the road to the middle trailhead at Horsepasture Saddle, and ride southeast to where it meets Road 1993. From there, turn left, and follow the road approximately 11 miles back to the middle trailhead. Riders can then descend the lower, steep portion of the trail to the parking area.

Technical Difficulty: Difficult

Physical Difficulty: Difficult

 

Old Foley Road offers an easy 10 ½ mile loop ride over gravel and paved roads.

Start the ride at the McKenzie Ranger Stations' wellness trail (behind the bunkhouses on the east side) and travel 0.7 mile to Foley Rd. #2643. Turn right and travel to the intersection with Rd. #410 and turn right on the Rd. #410. Travel five miles to Rd. #347 and go right. After about 14 miles, take a right at Horse Creek and travel to Highway 126. Make another right turn and ride 1.5 miles to reach the McKenzie River National Recreation Trail, which leads back to the Ranger Station.

Technical Difficulty: Easy

Physical Difficulty: Easy

Dining

 

From fine dining to takeouts for picnics

Where to eat on the McKenzie River

McKenzie Stage Stop Restaurant

Homemade Soups, Prime Rib
Burgers, Sandwiches, Salmon

38491 McKenzie Hwy., Cedar Flat

Aunt Ding’s Family Restaurant

Home cookin’ served with a smile & a blessing Daily Specials - Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

39297 McKenzie Hwy., Walterville

Ray’s Food Place Deli

Always Fresh Food
Sandwiches, Pizza By the Slice, Bakery

39317 McKenzie Hwy., Walterville


Ike’s Lakeside Pizza

23 Kinds of Oregon style Pizza
Sandwiches • Broasted Chicken

44851 McKenzie Hwy., Leaburg

Vida Community Market Deli

Sandwiches, Hot Dogs, Snacks
And Much, Much More

45602 McKenzie Hwy., Vida

Vida Cafe

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
Home of the McKenzie Monster Burger

45641 McKenzie Hwy., Vida, OR


Finn Rock Grill (Seasonal)

From Soups & Burgers
To Steaks & Desserts

50660 McKenzie Hwy., Finn Rock

Rustic Skillet

Great American comfort food
Full breakfast menu

54771 McKenzie Hwy., Rainbow

Takoda’s Restaurant

Featuring fresh, high quality food
Full salad bar, pizzas & seafood options

91806 Mill Creek Rd., Rainbow


Harbick’s Country Store Deli

Fresh sandwiches daily
Chicken, meatballs & side orders

91808 Mill Creek Rd., Rainbow

McKenzie Station Espresso & Deli

Deli Sandwiches
Homemade Soups & Chili

56393 McKenzie Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

Belknap Springs Grill (Seasonal)

Sandwiches and salads including two fisted, fully loaded all American cheeseburger

Belknap Springs Rd., McKenzie Bridge


Clear Lake Resort (Seasonal)

Snack Bar Overlooking the Lake: 
Burgers, Fries & Pies

Milepost 2, Clear Lake Cutoff

Hoodoo Ski Area (Seasonal)

Cafeteria & Deli, Pizza Pub, Restaurant & Lounge

Hwy. 20, Top of Santiam Pass

 

 
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Mailing Address: 59059 Old McKenzie Highway, McKenzie Bridge, Oregon  97413

Fishing

Fishing in the McKenzie River area

Hatchery Trout

All hatchery rainbow trout released into the McKenzie River are marked with an adipose fin clip and anglers must release all non fin-clipped (wild) trout in the mainstem river. The lower 11 miles of the McKenzie River below the Hayden Bridge - and the McKenzie River upstream from Forest Glen Boat Ramp at Blue River - are restricted to angling with lures and flies only, and all trout must be released.

Native Trout

Native rainbow, often called “McKenzie redsides,” occur in the mainstem McKenzie upstream to Tamolitch Falls and in the lower portions of medium and large tributaries above Leaburg Dam (Indian, Gate, Marten, Deer, Quartz, and Horse creeks and Blue River, South Fork McKenzie, and Smith River).

Legal-size hatchery rainbow trout are stocked in the mainstem, including Leaburg Lake, from Bellinger Landing (River Mile 19) to the Forest Glen Landing (RM 53.5) and in Blue River above Blue River Reservoir.

The name “cutthroat” is derived form the two red slash marks or streaks on the underside of the lower jaw. On some fish this mark may be indistinct or lacking. Cutthroat trout are ubiquitous throughout McKenzie River and the rest of the basin, living in most perennial streams, including areas above Tamolitch Falls and small, higher gradient tributaries not inhabited by rainbow trout.

Hatchery produced cutthroat trout originating from Hackleman Creek in the upper McKenzie watershed are released into some small, high elevation lakes.

Small cutthroat rear for several years in the tributaries and then migrate to the McKenzie River. They rear in the McKenzie until they are about 10 to 12 inches long and then return to the tributaries in early spring to spawn. Many live to spawn again.

Brook trout

(Salvelinus fontinalis) are not native to the McKenzie Basin. Naturalized brook trout populations in streams in the McKenzie Basin are often locally abundant and composed of small but mature fish. Brook trout have established naturalized populations in Hackleman Creek, the upper mainstem McKenzie from Clear Lake to Trail Bridge Reservoir, and in the upper reaches of Horse Creek, Blue River and the South Fork McKenzie.

Whitefish

are native to the McKenzie Basin and are one of the most abundant fish in the mainstem McKenzie. One population is confined to the South Fork McKenzie above Cougar Dam, and the other is found in the mainstem McKenzie up to Trail Bridge Dam and includes the South Fork McKenzie below Cougar Dam, and the lower portions of larger tributaries such as Gate, Quartz, and Horse creeks and Blue River.

Chinook Salmon

Onchorynchus Tshawytscha. Spring Chinook start their migration from the Pacific Ocean in late February-March and reach the McKenzie River area through the summer. The angling season for Chinook closes on August 15th on the Mckenzie to preserve the only wild run of Spring Chinook in the Willamette Valley. The fish don't eat during their migration, living off fat stored in their bodies.

Steelhead

are not native to the McKenzie River. Summer steelhead smolts have been released each year beginning in 1972. About 95% of the fish returning to the McKenzie River are hatchery produced and can be identified by an adipose fin clip. Smolts are released direct from Leaburg Hatchery just below Leaburg Dam and the returning adults tend to concentrate in this area.

Squawfish

are found in the lower McKenzie up to  Hayden Bridge, but in warm years may occasionally be found  upstream as far as Leaburg Dam.

Other varieties of fish found in local waters include include northern pikeminnow, speckled dace, redside shiners, suckers, sculpins, sticklebacks, and lampreys.

Hiking Trails


Backpacking Trails

 

Day Hiking

 


 

Trail Difficulty Ratings

Trail difficulty ratings are generally based on trail condition, steepness of grades, gain and loss of elevation, and the amount and kinds of natural barriers that must be traversed.

  • Easy: 20% grade, ranging from 18 to 24 inches wide with a spot gravel surface.
  • Moderate: 30% grade, ranging from 12 to 18 inches wide with roots, imbedded rocks and some logs in the surface.
  • Difficult: 30% grade, averaging 12 inches wide with no graded treads.

 

 

Hiking Tips (The 12 Essentials)
If you are a newcomer to hiking in Oregon, a few words of caution: weather is unpredictable and changes rapidly. Your trip will be more pleasant if you are prepared for rain or snow even on a sunny summer day. Water found along the trail should always be treated if you decide to drink it.
You should carry:
  • Map and compass
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Candles
  • Matches, or other fire-starter

    •  make sure matches are protected
  • Small knife.
  • First aid kit

    • carry items that take care of blisters, headaches, etc. 
  • Sunglasses
  • sunscreen & mosquito repellent
  • Mirror & whistle
  • Rain-gear and extra clothing
  • Water

    • at least one quart
  • Extra food

    • high energy snack such as candy, jerky or meat bars

 

Remember: You can’t count on cell phone coverage in remote areas!

 


Trail Locations:


Bear Flat Trail #3301:

 Follow USFS Rd. #19 four miles. At Cougar Dam turn left unto USFS Rd. #1993 for 14 miles, then right to Pat Saddle Trailhead. Park and follow Olallie Trail 4 miles. Length: 7.1 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate.


Benson Lake Trail #3502:

Drive on Highway 242 about 17 miles to the Scott Lake Road 260. Take the road to the end.

Length: 6 miles. Use: Medium to High. Difficulty: Easy to Moderate.


Buck Mountain Trail #3304:

Follow USFS Rd. #15 five miles. Turn onto USFS Rd. # 1509 for 0.5 miles, then turn left unto USFS Rd. #1510, go 3.5 miles to the trailhead. Length: 2.5 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Carpenter Mountain Trail #3302:

Follow Road 15 for 3.5 miles to the 1506 road. Travel east on the 1506 road for 7 miles, then turn north on the 350. The trail is located at the end of 350 about 6 miles up. Length: 1 mile. Use: Low. Difficulty: Moderate.


Castle Rock Trail #3506:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for 0.5 miles. At the stop sign go straight onto USFS Rd. #19-410 for 1.75 miles, and then turn left onto USFS Rd. #19-411 for 2.25 miles. Length: 2.6 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Easy to moderate.


Chucksney Mountain Trail #3306:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for 32 miles and turn right into the Box Canyon Horse Camp. The junction with the Chucksney Mountain Trail is a 0.5-mile hike up the Grasshopper Trail. Length: 6.0 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Clear Lake Loop Trail # 3507:

Access from the Clear Lake Resort or from Cold Water Cove Campground on the east side of the resort area. Length: 5 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Moderate.


Crossing Way Trail #3307:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for 26 miles. Turn left unto USFS Rd. #1958 and continue for another 3 miles. Length: 6.3 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Deer Butte Trail # 3508:

Take Rd. 2649 (Scott Creek) about 8 miles to Rd. 676. Turn left and drive about  mile to the end of the road and Fingerboard Prairie Trailhead. The trail can also be accessed from the Benson Trail No. 3502; Park at the Tenas Trailhead on Rd. 640. To access from the Robinson Lake Trailhead, take Rd. 2664 (Robinson Lake) from Hwy. 126. Turn right and park at the trailhead about 4 miles down Rd. 2664.


Delta Nature Trail #3317:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for 0.25 miles and turn right into the Delta Campground. Continue into the campground and park in the Nature Trail parking lot. Length: 0.5 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Easy.


East Fork Trail #3308:

Take USFS Rd. #19 four miles to the top of Cougar Dam. At the dam turn left unto USFS Rd. #1993 and travel 4 more miles to the far eastern end of the Echo Boat Ramp parking lot. Length: 5.9 miles. Use: Light to moderate. Difficulty: Moderate.


Echo Trail # 3309:

Follow Road 19 for 3 miles to Cougar Dam. Turn left onto Rd. 1993 for 2.8 miles to the East Fork Trailhead. Length: 2.6 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: More Difficult.


Elk Creek Trail #3510:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 24 miles, turn left unto USFS Rd. #1964 for 2.25 miles, and then turn left unto USFS Rd. #456 to the Elk Creek trailhead. Length: 8.8 miles. Use: Light to moderate. Difficulty: Difficult to moderate.


Foley Ridge Trail # 3511:

Take Road 2643 about 9-1/2 miles to junction with a spur road - stay left and follow the Foley Trailhead signs. Foley Ridge Trailhead is located at the end of the road, about 2 more miles. Length: 8.5 miles. Use: Medium to Heavy during big game hunting season. Difficultly: Moderate with steep pitches.


French Pete Trail #3311:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for 11 miles to arrive at the French Pete Trailhead parking lot. Length: 9.7 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Frissel Trail #3512:

Take the dump road (Refuse Disposal Site) stay to the right on USFS Rd. #2633-705. The road forks again after app. 1 mile stay to the right on USFS Rd. #2633-700. At the junction of a private road, take the left fork (USFS Rd. #2633-704) for app. 3/4 mile. Length: 2.5 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Grasshopper Trail #3569:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 32 miles to the Box Canyon Horse Camp. Length: 13.5 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Hand Lake Trail #3513:

Take Highway 242 about 18 miles to the Hand Lake Trailhead, a small pullout is located on the right side of the highway. Length: 9 miles. Use: Medium to High. Difficulty: Easy to Moderate.


Horse Creek Trail # 3514:

Take Horse Creek Road No. 2638 about 9-1/2 miles to Horse Creek Trailhead. Length: 13 miles. Use: Low. Difficultly: Moderate to Difficult.


Horsepasture Mountain Trail # 4347:

Take Horse Creek Road for 2 miles and turn right on Road 1993. The trailhead is located about 10 miles up Road 1993 on the right. Length: 1.2 miles. Use: Medium. Difficulty: Difficult.


Indian Ridge Trail #3315:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for11.5 miles. Turn right unto USFS Rd. #1980-247 and follow it for 2 miles to an old clear-cut unit and the trailhead. Length: 2 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate.


King Castle Trail #4326:

Take Horse Creek Rd. (#2638) and follow it 2 miles to King Rd. (#2639). Take King Road another 3.5 miles. Length: 3 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Moderate


Lava River Trail #3540:

Follow Hwy. 242 to the Dee Wright Observatory. Length: 0.5 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Easy.


Linton Lake Trail #3519:

Take Hwy 242 to milepost 65.5. The access point is 1/4 mile west of the Alder Springs Campground. Length: 1.2 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Easy.


Lookout Creek Old-Growth Trail #4105:

Take Forest Road #15 and continue driving 3 1/2 more miles, past Blue River Reservoir, to Forest Road #1506. Turn right and proceed about 7 miles to the lower marked trailhead or 10 miles to the upper trailhead. Length: 2.6 miles. Use: Low. Difficulty: Moderate to Difficult.


Louise Creek Trail #3520:

This is an internal wilderness connector trail, accessed from Separation Lake Trail #3536 or Foley Ridge Trail #3511. Length: 7.3 miles from Jct. Separation Lake Trail #3536 to Buck Meadows. Use: Medium. Difficulty: Moderate with steep pitches.


Lowder Mountain Trail #3329:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 4 miles to Cougar Dam. At the dam turn left onto USFS Rd. #1993. Drive 10 miles to the junction of USFS Rd. #1993 and USFS Rd. #555. Length: 10.75 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


McBee Trail #3523:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for 32 miles to the Box Canyon Guard Station, turn left unto USFS Rd. #1957 and travel 0.5 miles. Length: 15 miles. Use: Light to moderate. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


McKenzie River Trail #3507:

Milepost 52 on Hwy. 126. Length: 27 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Easy.


Nash Lake Trail #3527:

Turn onto Horse Creek Road and travel 5 1/2 miles to the end of the road. Follow Horse Creek Trail for 6.5 miles. Length: 8.4 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Moderate with steep pitches.


Obsidian Trail # 3528:

Drive 16.7 miles up Highway 242 to the Obsidian Trailhead. Length: 4.2 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Difficult.


Olallie Trail #3529:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 4 miles to Cougar Dam and turn left unto USFS Rd. #1993. Travel another 14 miles to Pat Saddle trailhead. Length: 12.2 miles. Use: Light to moderate. Difficulty: Moderate.


Olallie Mountain Trail #4100:

Follow USFS Rd. #19 for 4 miles to Cougar Dam. At the dam turn left unto USFS Rd. #1993 for 14 miles to Pat Saddle trailhead. From the trailhead hike up the Olallie Trail #3529 for 2.25 miles to the junction with the Olallie Mtn. Trail. Length: 1.4 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Difficult.


O'Leary Mountain Trail # 3321:

Follow Rd. 19 (Cougar Dam) to Rd 1900-410 for 2 miles toward the powerhouse at Cougar Dam and turn east on 1900-411 and proceed 2.5 miles. Length: 9.1 miles. Use: Low. Difficulty: More to Most Difficult.

 


Patjens Lake Trail #3395:

From Hwy. 20, go right to the Hoodoo Ski Bowl and turn right again. Follow USFS Rd. #2690 to the west end of Big Lake. Length: 5.6 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Moderate, occasionally steep.


Proxy Falls Loop Trail #3532:

Follow Hwy. 242 for 9.7 miles. Length: 1.5-mile loop. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Easy.


Quaking Aspen Trail # 3332:

Take Rd. 19 for 3 miles to Cougar Dam and turn left onto Rd. 1993 for 12 miles to Lowder Trailhead. Length: 1.9 miles. Use: Low Difficulty: More Difficult.


Rainbow Falls Trail # 3543:

Take Road 2643 about 6 miles to trailhead on right side of the road. Length: 1-1/2 miles. Use: Low. Difficulty: Easy.


Rebel Creek Trail #3323:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 14 miles to the Rebel trailhead. Length: 9.2 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Rebel Rock Trail #3324:

Take USFRS Rd. #19 for 14 miles to the Rebel trailhead. Length: 6.5 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Roaring Ridge Trail # 3312Take Rd. 19 (Cougar Dam) for 25.5 miles, turn left onto Rd. 1958 and continue on for 6.5 miles. Length: 2.9 miles. Use: Low. Difficulty: More Difficult.

 


Robinson Lake Trail #4342:

Take USFS Rd. #2664 (Robinson Lake Rd.) for 4 miles to the trailhead. Length: 0.25 miles. Use: Medium. Difficulty: Easy.


Scott Trail #3531:

Travel for 14 miles on Hwy. 242. Parking is across the highway on USFS Rd. #260. Length: 5 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.


Scott Mountain Trail #4339:

Take the Scott Lake Road 260 to the end, where the trailhead for Benson Lake Trail is located, then 3 miles to the junction of the Scott Mountain Trail. Length: 1 mile. Use: Medium to High. Difficultly: Moderate.


Separation Lake Trail #3536:

At Hwy. 126 milepost 53, turn right unto USFS Rd. #2643 (Foley Ridge Rd.). The trailhead is located on USFS Rd. #480. Length: 6 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Moderate.


South Fork Trail #3327:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 23 miles to USFS Rd. #19-441. Drive 0.5 miles to the trailhead. Hike up the Olallie Trail #3529, for 1 mile. The South Fork Trail leaves Olallie Trail to the right. Length: 2.1 miles. Use: Moderate. Difficulty: Easy.

 


Terwilliger Hot Springs #3319:

Travel on Aufderheide Drive for 7.5 miles to Terwilliger Hot Springs parking lot. The hike is 1/4 mile to the hot springs. Use: Heavy.


Tidbits Trail #3328:

Follow USFS Rd. #15 for 4.7 miles to USFS Rd. #1509. Travel another 8 miles. It’s another 1/4-mile walk along the logging spur road to the trailhead. Length: 2.8 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult.

 


Walker Creek Trail #3330:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 4 miles to Cougar Dam. Turn left onto USFS Rd. #1993 and travel 10 miles to the junction of USFS Rd. #1993 and #555. The Lowder Mtn. and Walker Creek trailheads are on the right side of the road. Hike up Lowder Mtn. Trail #3329 for 2 miles to the junction of Walker Creek Trail: 8.4 miles. Use: Light to moderate. Difficulty: Difficult.


Waterfalls Loop Trail # 3507:

Access from the parking areas of Sahalie Falls and Koosah Falls Viewpoints. Length: 3 miles. Use: Heavy. Difficulty: Moderate.


Wildcat Trail #3331:

Take USFS Rd. #19 for 23 miles to USFS Rd. #19-441 and go 0.5 miles to the trailhead. Hike up the Olallie Trail #3529 for 4.6 miles. Wildcat Trail is on the right, just after the Rebel Creek Trail #3323. Length: 5.6 miles. Use: Light. Difficulty: Moderate.

Yankee Mountain Trail # 3318:

Take Rd. 19 (Cougar Dam) and proceed 11 miles to the French Pete Trailhead parking lot. Length: 3.7 miles. Use: Low. Difficulty: Most Difficult.

 


McKenzie River Reflections

Lodging & RV Parks

Lodging

Duck Inn

On Leaburg Lake

The Wayfarer Resort

46725 Goodpasture Road, Vida

Riverside Inn

45441 McKenzie Hwy., Vida

McKenzie River Inn B&B

49164 McKenzie Hwy., Vida

Eagle Rock Lodge

49198 McKenzie Hwy., Vida

Heaven’s Gate Cottages

50055 McKenzie Hwy., Vida

McKenzie River Mountain Resort

51668 Blue River Dr., Blue River

Woodland Cottages

52560 McKenzie Hwy., Blue River

Holiday Farm Resort

54455 McKenzie River Dr., Rainbow

McKenzie Riverside Cottages

54466 McKenzie River Dr., Rainbow

Harbick’s Country Inn

54791 McKenzie Hwy., Rainbow

McKenzie River Conference Center

54705 McKenzie Hwy., Rainbow

St. Benedict Lodge

56630 N. Bank Rd., McKenzie Bridge

Inn at the Bridge

56393 McKenzie Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

Caddisfly Resort

56404 McKenzie Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

Horse Creek Lodge

56228 Delta Dr., McKenzie Bridge

McKenzie Bridge Cabins

56245 Delta Dr., McKenzie Bridge

Cedarwood Lodge

56535 McKenzie Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

Loloma Lodge

56687 McKenzie Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

Camp Yale Mountain Homes

58910 Old McK. Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

White Branch Youth Camp

61500 Old McK. Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

Belknap Hot Springs Resort

59299 N. Belknap Springs Rd., McKenzie Bridge

Clear Lake Resort

Milepost 2, Clear Lake Cutoff

 

 

RV Parks

Vida-Lea Mobile Lodge

44221 McKenzie Hwy., Leaburg

Lazy Days R.V. & Mobile Home Park

52511 McKenzie Hwy., Blue River

Holiday Farm RV Park

54432 McKenzie Hwy., Rainbow

Rainbow Mobile Home and R.V. Park

54655 McKenzie River Dr., Rainbow

Patio R.V. Park

55636 McKenzie River Dr., Blue River

Camp Yale

58980 Old McK. Hwy., McKenzie Bridge

Belknap Hot Springs Resort

59299 N. Belknap Springs Rd., McKenzie Bridge

Hoodoo Mountain Resort

Top of the Santiam Pass, Hwy. 20

 
 
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Mailing Address: 59059 Old McKenzie Highway, McKenzie Bridge, Oregon  97413