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Sahalie slack lineMCKENZIE BRIDGE: Ex-treme-sport enthusiasts from Canada were walking an inch-wide band of nylon across the 90-foot high Sahalie Falls last Monday afternoon.
Michael Neururer and the other members of the group, SlackLifeBc, crossed the high span during a tour of Oregon highline locations, including Smith Rock State Park in Central Oregon.
“It was a group of ten people from all over,” Neururer said. “The slacklifeBC crew, Ari in the air from Oregon, one from Hawaii, a few from Colorado and even Europeans.”
Based in Vancouver, British Columbia,  the  SlackLife  organization follows a team of mountain athletes as “they push the limits exploring mountains and the sport of slacklining,” according to the group’s website, which features images and videos of their exploits.
Neururer said the group arrived at the waterfall around lunch time. “With all the hands the line was set up within 45 minutes and ready to be walked. Seven out of the ten all walked the line and did various acrobatic tricks on them such as splits, planks, exposure turns etc.,” he said.

Off Beat Oregon History

Orlando MurrayBy Finn JD John

Early in November 1906, 21-year-old Orlando Murray went to pay a call on a 22-year-old acquaintance named Lincoln C. Whitney. The main subject of their conversation was to be Murray’s 16-year-old sister, Mary. Secondary topics for the two men’s tete-a-tete included wedding bells and a baby shower – not necessarily in that order – and, last but not least, a .38-caliber revolver.
The conversation did not go well.
Whitney had met Mary when she’d traveled from her Portland home to Hubbard, where Whitney lived, to work in the hop fields for a week. Whitney had, Orlando Murray said (and, later, testified), sweet-talked the cute young out-of-towner into bed with fair promises of marriage, then disappeared as thoroughly as he could. Meanwhile, several weeks after their brief liaison, Mary suddenly found herself in a very awkward position.


Doodles By Barry McWilliams

Gardening Tips

Russian lavenderBy Kym Pokorny

Hotter-than-usual temperatures and longer stretches between measurable moisture this year mean plants need more water from the end of a hose.

Choose plants that require less water and you’ll save time and money and help sustain Oregon’s water supply, said Amy Jo Detweiler, a horticulturist with Oregon State University’s Extension Service.


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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.