Gardening Tips

DeadheadingBy Tiffany Woods
Deadheading is a gardening chore that many people find pleasant – by pinching off fading flowers, you can beautify your landscape and keep some plants blooming longer. But is it necessary?

SpinachPlant fall and winter vegetables now
By Daniel Robison
In mild parts of western Oregon and along most of the coast, it is possible to grow a succession of garden vegetables throughout most of the year. Gardeners can extend the season well into fall in many parts of the Pacific Northwest with a little knowledge and protection of their plants from the elements.
When space becomes available after harvesting the last spring-planted peas or greens, keep those veggies coming.

WateringBy Tiffany Woods
Ross Penhallegon, a horticulturist with the Oregon State University Extension Service, recommends watering during the early morning hours. That's because there is usually less wind to affect the soaker hose, drip or sprinkler pattern. Plus, the temperatures are lower in the early morning, meaning more water gets into the soil and doesn't evaporate.

 

Sweet cornBy Denise Ruttan
Could your spotless peppers or flawless flowers have what it takes to claim the blue ribbon at your local or county fair this summer?
With some insider tips from Lynn Long, you could make this your year to test their mettle. Long, a horticulturalist for the Oregon State University Extension Service and county leader for the OSU Extension Service in Wasco County, previously served as a judge at the Wasco County Fair and Rodeo for several years.

Flowering currantBy Denise Ruttan
If you don't have much space to plant shrubs, you'll want to keep an eye out for Oregon Snowflake, a new flowering currant developed by Oregon State University that is smaller than other currants.   
This low-growing shrub is the first cultivar to come out of OSU's new ornamental plant breeding program, according to Ryan Contreras, a plant breeder and assistant professor in OSU's Department of Horticulture.

HoneybeeBy Denise Ruttan
Consider adding some flower power to your landscape to bring in the buzz of pollinators to your garden.  
"Floral abundance is one of the strongest ways to promote bee diversity in gardens," said Gail Langellotto, the statewide coordinator for the Oregon State University Extension Service's Master Gardener program.

Big pumpkinBy Denise Ruttan
Halloween may be months away but if you are hoping to grow monster pumpkins, now is the time to start planting.
The world record monster pumpkin of 2013 weighed in at 2,032 pounds, according to the New York Botanical Garden.

BlueberriesBy Denise Ruttan
Plant blueberries now for a great crop of sweet, healthful fruit in the future.
Three categories of blueberry plants are best-suited for Oregon climates: Northern highbush varieties, rabbiteye varieties and half-high varieties, according to Bernadine Strik, a berry specialist with the Oregon State University Extension Service.

Pear fungusBy Denise Ruttan
As the blossoms fade in your apple and pear trees this spring, keep an eye out for a fungus that flourishes in warm, wet weather, cautions the Oregon State University Extension Service.
"The longer this spring stays wet and the warmer it gets, there are more chances that we'll see problems with apple and pear scab in our fruit-growing areas such as the Willamette Valley,

Vege startsBy Denise Ruttan
When the first daffodils bloom to let us know that spring is around the corner, it is time to start vegetable seeds indoors or in the greenhouse.
It's best to start cool-season crops such as lettuce, cabbage, kale and chard in late February to early March in western Oregon, said Weston Miller, a horticulturist with the Oregon State University Extension Service.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.