Gardening Tips

By Denise Ruttan

A greenhouse in NewportJudie Rickus' greenhouse in Newport. (Photo by Judie Rickus)

Do Oregon's short, dark winter days have you dreaming of the sunshine of exotic lands? Jazz up your windowsill with glamorous orchids.

 

 

By Denise Ruttan

Rain gardenPhoto by Derek Godwin
Rain gardens feature hardy, drought-resistant plants in a landscaping design with a purpose.
Oregon's winters are a good time to observe how water flows on your property so you can later create a rain garden.

Snow & Woody Plants

 

Trees broken by snow"Snow is both friend and foe to trees and shrubs," says Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist with the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA). "Snow causes its share of damage, as we all know, but in many cases it also protects plants and their roots against extreme fluctuations in temperature that could damage or even kill them."

By Denise Ruttan
PoinsettiasPoinsettias make popular holiday gifts. When you bring one indoors, keep a consistent temperature for the heat-loving plant. (Photo by Hannah O'Leary.)

A traditional holiday centerpiece, bright poinsettias bring cheer to many homes in the short, dark days of winter.
But should you put the south-of-the-border plant in the ground after the holidays?

 

Interior tree decayTree failure is a major cause of residential property damage, as well as the leading cause of power outages nationwide. An ice storm can overload all the branches on a tree, a hurricane or high wind can blow down a tree if its roots are compromised, or a cracked tree can fail under its own weight.

Spruce up your Christmas tree with these tips

By Denise Ruttan

Christmas tree needlesChristmas tree needles - Look for trees with firm needles that bounce back when you bend them. (Photo by Lynn Ketchum.)

After Thanksgiving, most tree lots are busy welcoming the crowds for a festive annual tradition – choosing the Christmas tree that will warm your home this December.

Tree Pruning 101

Illustration of tree pruningThe objective of pruning is to produce strong, healthy, attractive plants. By understanding how, when and why to prune, and by following a few simple principles, this objective can be achieved.

Guidebook identifies good bugs and the bad bugs they love to eat

By Judy Scott
With a hand lens and photo-illustrated guide by Oregon State University Extension and Oregon Tilth, you can teach yourself to identify beneficial insects that prey on crop pests.

An organic fieldBy Judy Scott
Gardening resources often recommend chemical fertilizers with N-P-K (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium) ratios, but for organic gardeners, the numbers can be frustrating. Manure and other organic materials often don't come with N-P-K ratings, especially if purchased in bulk.

Are pesticides hazardous?

That’s up to you!

Don't spray pesticides like this

 

By Tim Stock
Pesticides can harm humans, animals, birds, fish, insects, and plants if used carelessly.

 

 

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.