Gardening Tips

Guidebook identifies good bugs and the bad bugs they love to eat

By Judy Scott
With a hand lens and photo-illustrated guide by Oregon State University Extension and Oregon Tilth, you can teach yourself to identify beneficial insects that prey on crop pests.

An organic fieldBy Judy Scott
Gardening resources often recommend chemical fertilizers with N-P-K (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium) ratios, but for organic gardeners, the numbers can be frustrating. Manure and other organic materials often don't come with N-P-K ratings, especially if purchased in bulk.

Are pesticides hazardous?

That’s up to you!

Don't spray pesticides like this

 

By Tim Stock
Pesticides can harm humans, animals, birds, fish, insects, and plants if used carelessly.

 

 

A dead tree or shrub?

Learn from a

post-mortem analysis

OSU tips for not killing trees

 

By Judy Scott
Often we discover in the spring that a tree or shrub just didn't make it through the winter.

 

Tree full of applesBy Carol Savonen

There are hundreds of varieties of apples grown in Oregon, from old heirlooms to modern disease resistant cultivars. But often apple tree owners don’t know what kind of apple tree they have, much less recognize when their specific type of apple is at its peak of perfection and ready to harvest.

Giant pumpkin by Scott CulleyBy Judy Scott
Pumpkins and other winter squash can grow like weeds, and as they trail out between raised beds and down rows of corn, gardeners often ask how and where to store them all.

Giant pumpkin carved by Scott Cully

See plants turn fall colors

before you buy them

Fall leavesBy Davi Richards & Carol Savonen
Northwest gardeners are blessed with many evergreen plants that keep the landscape looking alive all year. Even so, a vibrant splash of color in the garden can ease the loss of summer.

Fight fire with plants?

You bet.

OSU fire bookletBy Judy Scott

Create brush piles and watch

local wildlife thrive!

Brush pile photoby eNature

Autumn is the best time of the year to create some brush piles for the birds in your backyard. Fall trimmings can be piled up in a corner or along the edge of the yard, where it will give ground-inhabiting birds additional cover against winter weather and predators.

Create Some Brush Piles Now And Watch Your Local Wildlife Thrive!

Brush pile photoby eNature

Autumn is the best time of the year to create some brush piles for the birds in your backyard. Fall trimmings can be piled up in a corner or along the edge of the yard, where it will give ground-inhabiting birds additional cover against winter weather and predators.

Pages

McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.