Gardening Tips

Create Some Brush Piles Now And Watch Your Local Wildlife Thrive!

Brush pile photoby eNature

Autumn is the best time of the year to create some brush piles for the birds in your backyard. Fall trimmings can be piled up in a corner or along the edge of the yard, where it will give ground-inhabiting birds additional cover against winter weather and predators.

Photo of garlic

Select healthy large cloves, free of disease.

Photo by Rachel Beck

Article By Tiffany Woods

Fall is approaching but don't put away your hoe and gardening gloves just yet.

Tips to deter pillaging raccoons

By Judy Scott
Raccoons are wonderful animals to watch, but can be a real pain in the garden.

By Tiffany Woods

Mulching with leavesNow is the time to plan your no-till garden for next year.
"The crux of no-till gardening is to pile on enough mulch so that weeds don't germinate and grow up through it," said Barb Fick, a horticulturist with the Oregon State University Extension Service, who has kept her large vegetable garden viable with the no-dig method for years.

Image of rosemaryFrom The Herb Companion
By Tina Marie Wilcox
Q. I have a potted rosemary plant in my house, and ever since I brought it in for the winter (I live in Wisconsin) it has been turning brown and seems to be dying. I’ve been watering it once a week. Am I overwatering it? I try to keep it in the sun when it shines in the kitchen window. Does it need more sun? Please help.

Rainwater system in McKenzie River ReflectionsFrom MOTHER EARTH NEWS
By Cheryl Long
Harvesting rainwater to use for growing vegetables makes a great deal of sense. Unfortunately, the most common method of rainwater harvesting isn’t the most effective. Typically, gardeners invest in a rain barrel - which holds only 50 or 60 gallons of water - and then dole out the captured water to plants as needed, hopefully emptying the barrel before the next storm.

Wheelbarrow plant containerFrom Natural Home & Garden

By Jenny Andrews

If you’re looking for home décor that is beautiful, affordable, suited to any taste and actually improves the health and wellness of your home, look no further than your neighborhood garden center. With their wide array of colors, shapes and textures, houseplants are a perfect way to enliven your home’s interior landscape.

Photo of rain garden

From GRIT magazine

By Patricia Escarcega

Tired of that muddy puddle in the middle of the yard, or that washed-out mini-gulley that forms whenever a downpour loads up your home’s downspouts? If so, it might be time to get a handle on all that runoff and put it to good use with a rain garden.

Herbs, wildflowers and ornamental grasses.

From The Herb Companion

By Kathleen Halloran

When I discover an undemanding plant that thrives in my toughest garden spots, I’m usually not surprised to learn how it comes by its easygoing nature: It’s a native.

Garden Tips from Mother Earth News
From: MOTHER EARTH NEWS
Story by: Ellen Sandbeck

Summertime, and the living is too mosquitoey and itchy? It’s a common complaint. And mosquitoes are not only a nuisance - they can also spread West Nile virus.

Pages

McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.