History

Cayuse horsemenBy Finn J.D. John
Joe Crabb was a gambling man - that much, at least, we know. And in 1871, he’d put his money down on an absolute ironclad sure thing.
It was a horse race, and Crabb was a horseman. He was matching his own best animal, a magnificent thoroughbred, against a smallish spotted pony belonging to Howlish Wampoo, the chief of the Cayuse Indian tribe.

FAX: 541-663-4550

Tom Lincoln: thomas.lincoln@comcast.net

Ken Engelman: rivref@aol.com

Fund thermometerPeople interested in seeing the Arch reconstructed in Springfield contributed to an online fundraising project launched in June of 2013. The money they contributed was used to construct the scale model. To learn more about the project on Kickstarter click here.

 

Model Arch constructionIn the interim the committee moved forward with a project to produce a scale model of the arch to heighten public knowledge of our plans.  The model will be displayed at several area festivals and public venues where people can make direct contributions to help fund studies to

Ladies Civic ClubBack in the 1920's, the Springfield Ladies Civic Club made their dreams a reality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following three years of feasibility analysis, research and meetings with public officials, the Friends of the Springfield Arch has been formed to chart a plan for rebuilding the  Springfield Gateway Arch. The group agrees that a strategy focused on introducing visitors to attractions in the areas to the east and to the west of the arch’s portal should be developed.

The Springfield/McKenzie Gateway Arch Project

East and west views of the proposed Arch

From the March 14, 2001 edition of McKenzie River Reflections

As a state highway crew worker, Brad Bigelow has cleaned up his share of road kill. Over the years there’s been quite a smorgasbord - from elk to deer, raccoons to dogs, cats to squirrels and even opossums. Last Saturday morning he got his first call to pick up a dead cow. Shortly after, he was notified to pick up another, then another.

From the February 14, 2001 edition of McKenzie River Reflections

BPA towersBy Finn J.D. John

On a sunny late afternoon, in a remote woodsy area near the base of Mount Hood, five fiery explosions rattled windowpanes in a few farmhouses along Highway 26 near the community of Brightwood.
It was immediately clear what the coordinated blasts had been: an attempt to take down the power grid.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.