History

Book coverWant to win a McKenzie history book?

Go to: http://alturl.com/xryri & fill out a short form. Then take a screen shot of your completed survey & send it to: rivref@aol.com. You'll be entered into a raffle to win a copy of our upcoming book - “Weir are we? Hatchery fish of the McKenzie.”  Portions of the book will contain first-person interviews from articles published & preserved in our archives. The deadline is 2/22/14.

 

 

Opium denBy Finn J.D. John

Most people think of opium today with a certain kind of mild romantic  nostalgia. We know it was bad, and people got hurt, but opium and the  demi-monde that developed around it had a certain dark allure with its  fragrant, smoky fumes and its elegant, exotic smoking rituals.

May 5, 2000, edition of McKenzie River Reflections

Seymour's ChateauBy Margaret Estenson

Sunken PT boatBy Finn J.D. John
The Porpoise was one ugly boat in 1992 when the guys from Portland first laid eyes on it.
It was a massive, weatherbeaten old hulk, 78 feet long and 20 feet wide, wallowing by the dock on Treasure Island in the Alameda estuary.

Mayor Geprge BakerBy Finn J.D. John

George L. Baker, the big, bluff, hail-fellow-well-met owner of Portland’s Baker Theater, was flabbergasted. As he and his fellow Portland Rosarians were getting ready to march in the 1917 Rose Festival parade, a courier had run up to him with a cryptic message:
“The grand marshal’s car awaits,” the messenger puffed. “Hurry and get in and don’t delay the parade.”
“Why, I’m not grand marshal,” Baker replied, puzzled.

Will DalyBy Finn J.D. John

Late on the evening of June 2, 1917, the Portland Morning Oregonian sprang a trap – a cunning and dirty trap.
The always-formidable daily newspaper, owned and edited by Henry Pittock following the death of the legendary Harvey Scott, had thrown its weight behind a big, boisterous City Council member named George Baker in the race for Portland city mayor. But in a fierce race with Union man and small-business owner Will Daly, Baker was clearly on track to lose.

Crooked gamblersBy Finn J.D. John

In November 1892 in downtown Portland, a “fast” young man named J.P. Cochran stepped off a passenger train from St. Louis, Missouri.
J.P. was the dashing 22-year-old son of a railroad executive. In St. Louis, he’d been running amok in the saloons and “faro banks,” getting into lots of high-spirited trouble with fast women and irresponsible friends. His father, wanting to get him away from the company he was keeping, had come up with a scheme to send him off to what he no doubt considered the most sober, hardworking, Little-House-on-the-Prairie-like place on Earth: Oregon.

Temperance protestBy Finn J.D. John

In 1853, a French-Canadian gambler, fighter and all-around rascal by the name of Edouard Chambreau arrived in the brand-new town of Portland, ready to go into business.
Chambreau had just come from the gold fields in northern California and southern Oregon, where he’d been wandering from town to town, fleecing miners and other gamblers and running from the occasional angry mob.

First cabinBy Finn J.D. John

Most people know Prohibition in the United States started in 1920 when the Volstead Act went into effect. But in Oregon, Prohibition started quite a bit earlier than that. Actually, it started before Oregon was even a state.
In 1844, the Oregon Territorial Government became the first in the United States to outlaw the use, manufacture or sale of booze.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.