McKenzie River

"Abe Lincoln spoke out last Sunday"

Lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

WALTERVILLE: “In giving freedom to the slaves, we guarantee freedom to the free.” Those words were spoken last Sunday by actor Steve Holgate who was wearing makeup and a period costume to portray Abraham Lincoln. Channeling the 16th U.S. President, he reflected that the Civil War had, “Begun as a conflict of our Union and became a revolution for men’s souls.”
Holgate’s appearance at the Walterville Community Center was a fundraiser for the Leaburg Library. A twelve-score crowd (about 125 people) filled the hall and heard snippets from some famous speeches, insights into different aspects of Lincoln life and an opportunity to pose questions during a mock press conference.

Sourcing of McKenzie fish has changed

Cat fish planting

 

 

 

 

 

LEABURG: People wondering about angling in the McKenzie River next year will have an opportunity to ask questions next Friday at a town hall meeting sponsored by the McKenzie River Chamber of Commerce. On the agenda will be potential changes related to a decision by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to defund and close the Leaburg Trout Hatchery.
The Leaburg Hatchery was built in 1953 to mitigate for the loss of trout production and habitat due to the construction of Cougar and Blue River Dams in the McKenzie Basin and operation of the Corps Willamette River Basin Projects. That mitigation involved 277,000 pounds of trout.

Work began on Tuesday

Goose logs

 

 

 

 

 

MCKENZIE BRIDGE: The start of logging at the Goose Timber Sale in the Willamette National Forest north of McKenzie Bridge has generated a response from environmentalists. The Cascadia Forest Defenders (CFD) have maintained a tree sit protest inside the Goose Timber Sale since late May and CFD reported evidence of logging on Tuesday, October 17th.
The group said their tree sit was searched and extensively photographed this Wednesday by Lane County Sherriff’s Deputies and Forest Service Officers with a promise to “see you tomorrow." This is the first contact CFD has had with law enforcement since the tree sit protest began six months ago.

Forest Service Road 19 (Aufderheide Scenic Byway) to Reopen October 14

Firefighters and road crews have been working diligently to mitigate hazards such as fire weakened trees and unstable slopes along Forest Service Road 19 (Aufderheide Scenic Byway) to make the road safe again for travelers. The road is scheduled to reopen in its entirety on Saturday, October 14th, just in time for peak fall foliage viewing along the byway.

Sept. 18: 9:49 am: Abandoned Vehicle – 41000 block, Holden Creek Ln. Involved is an older blue Toyota pickup, tags are expired. It has been parked there since Thursday of last week. Note on driver’s side seat – went for services, please don’t tow. Appears a transient is living in it & are down on their luck. Caller requests wait a few days. She will call back if vehicle is still there.

Aug. 30: 10:33: Burglary 1, Theft 1 – 35000 block, Camp Creek Rd. 3 hidden guns stolen – Ruger .38 Special, Remington wood stock semi automatic Model 74, .30-06, Remington laminate stock lever action Model 81.

10:45: Burglary – 37000 block, Camp Creek Rd. Taken: hand tools, sander, circular saw, drill, Sawzall – all cordless & chargers, also power washer.

Private fish farm’s bid was $575,000 more than ODFW’s

Desert Hatchery

 

 

 

 

A private central Oregon trout farm received a $1.3 million annual contract to grow trout that eventually will be planted in the Willamette River basin. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers awarded the contract September 15 to Desert Springs Trout Farm in Summer Lake.
Previously, the trout had been produced at the Leaburg Hatchery on the McKenzie River. Owned by the Corps, but operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the hatchery produced rainbow and cutthroat trout, as well as summer steelhead, as mitigation for losses due to Willamette River basin dams. Trout production at the Leaburg Hatchery is being phased out by the end of next year.
Corps officials said it had determined that trout mitigation could be done through a supply contract, such as those recently signed with ODFW, and that it does not need to operate a hatchery to acquire fish.

Over the last 11 days the Lane County Sheriff’s Office has been assigning extra patrols to the McKenzie Bridge community due to the fire activity.  This provided a law enforcement presence in areas that do not routinely see p

“Young adventurers” laid groundwork for tourism

Hand up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIDA: “About 1914 something kind of magical happened,” according to Randy Dersham, president of the McKenzie River Drift Boat Museum. The magic came about when log trucks replaced river drives as the most economical way of getting timber to sawmills combined with the creation of a graded road that drew recreationists up from Eugene who wanted to fish a pristine river.
“The young men that were log drivers in the homesteads around here at the time started to guide around 1920,” Randy told the gathering at last Saturday’s Eugene Symphony fundraiser.
The young entrepreneurs soon found the “Old Scow” design used to corral heavy logs wasn’t all that maneuverable when it came to avoiding rocks and rapids in fast water.
Credited with the first major advance in boat design was John West who opted for a wider craft that could seat two people side-by-side. Built out of fairly thick 3/4 inch boards and weighing around 500 lbs. It wasn’t a lightweight, except in comparison to the “Old Scows.”

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.