McKenzie River Reflections

Jan 1 wreck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RAINBOW: On January 1st, at approximately 2:35 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a single vehicle fatal crash on the McKenzie Hwy. near milepost 48.5.
The preliminary investigation indicates a green Nissan Pathfinder was traveling eastbound when, for an unknown reason, it lost control and crossed over the westbound lane of travel and off the roadway before striking a tree and catching on fire. The unidentified single occupant of the vehicle was pronounced deceased at the scene by responding fire and medical personnel.

Landslide at Terwilliger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COUGAR RESERVOIR: All access to Terwilliger Hot Springs is completely blocked by a large landslide that occurred overnight.  An unstable slope above Forest Road 19 (Aufderheide Drive) failed and the entire road is blocked and impassable.  The landslide deposit is over 30 feet high and consists of large boulders and loose dirt and mud.

The Drift

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plastic and glass won’t be recovered

Plastic recycling

 

 

 

 

 

 

WALTERVILLE: “Effective December first our company will no longer take plastic or glass through our recycling program.” That’s not something she wanted to do, according to Cheri Fuller, who along with her husband Darin, owns McKenzie Disposal. They aren’t alone.
Last month Lane County let people know that due to disruptions in the global recycling markets it would not be accepting most plastics at the Glenwood Transfer Station in Eugene as well as at all the other outlying transfer sites.
“Lane County is currently unable to market these materials due to a forthcoming ban on imports of mixed recycled materials into China,” according to  Waste Management Division Manager Daniel Hurley.

Corps, ODFW, Guides & new contractor pledge cooperation

Tom MacDonald pic

 

 

 

 

 

 

LEABURG: “Desert Hot Springs Trout Farm has been in business since 1985 and never had an outbreak of pathogens,” was a point stressed by Tom MacDonald last Friday. Speaking at a McKenzie Chamber of Commerce town hall meeting, he was part of a panel discussion on the future of angling in the McKenzie River region.
The session came about after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided this year to end a long term agreement to get trout from the Leaburg Trout Hatchery. It asked for bids to deliver 277,000 pounds of fish to stock streams and lakes in the Willamette basin. Desert Springs was awarded a $1.3 million contract on August 2nd.
Shortly after that decision,  Tammy Mackey, the Corps’ Portland District Fish Section chief, issued a statement saying, “Desert Springs’ proposal met the federal government’s requirements at a cost that provides the best value to taxpayers,” it said. “They have worked with ODFW in recent years and we feel confident that they will provide good stock that will meet the expectations of Oregon anglers and fish managers.”

Wisteria & house

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Kym Pokorny
Wisteria delivers a beautiful spring display, but this vigorous vine needs plenty of pruning to keep it from swallowing the garden.
“Wisteria are very vigorous vines and can climb easily to 30 to 40 feet,” said Neil Bell, a horticulturist with Oregon State University Extension Service. “They can be quite heavy and should be grown on a strong structure.”
When people see the jaw-dropping blooms erupt in mid-spring, they covet wisteria for their own garden. But, they should first know that in addition to the proper support, the vine needs vigorous pruning.

Lakeside hotel & seaplane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Finn J.D. John

For people like Bing Crosby, Lily Pons and Clark Gable, success in show business came with some distinct drawbacks ... millions of them: the fans. Screaming, pointing, asking for autographs and sending mash notes, they were a great inconvenience — yet it was their attention that had made the movie-star lifestyle possible.

On most days, the big stars handled it OK. But everyone needs a break now and then. Sometimes they wanted to go (with apologies to the classic sitcom Cheers) where absolutely nobody knew their name.

On those days, they would often point their long, low, powerful automobiles northward and drive deep into the lush forests of southern Oregon.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.