McKenzie River Reflections

Bruce ThorFINN ROCK: The fifteen artists at this year’s 3rd Annual Chainsaw Art Festival once again enthraled onlookers who watched them transform logs into works of art. For some running the saws, the end result may come from within the wood itself. Others, like Bruce Thor of Kent, Washington, approach each piece with an image already in their minds.
“Because I’m a cartoonist, I get ideas and have to have a piece of paper around at all times,” he explains. “I’m compulsively doodling over the winter.”
For Thor, a “third generation Icelandic American,” the attraction for refashioning logs goes back to 1996 when his mother cut down a tree in their front yard. In the process of making, “the worst bear I’ve ever done,”  he burned out her electric saw. But it was a step in a process that nudged him to attend his first gathering of carvers in the coastal town of Westport in 2000.

Concentrations of wildfire smoke affecting Lane County air quality

 

Smoke levels have elevated air quality warnings to the moderate range for several days now in the Eugene, Springfield, Cottage Grove, and Oakridge areas. Heavier smoke levels could push the air quality index (AQI) into the “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (USG)” level or even up to “Unhealthy.”

Phone Scammers Claiming to be Law Enforcement Officers

Navigation Obstruction - McKenzie River below Bellinger Boat Ramp

Biscuit fireAs mountain pine beetles and other insects chew their way through Western forests, forest fires might not seem far behind. Lands covered by dead trees appear ready to burst into flame.
However, an analysis of wildfire extent in Oregon and Washington over the past 30 years shows very little difference in the likelihood of fires in forests with and without insect damage. Indeed , other factors – drought, storms, and fuel accumulation from years of fire suppression – may be more important than insects in determining if fire is more or less likely from year to year.

Campfires in Developed Sites Now Prohibited

A campfire ban will go into effect across the Willamette National Forest on Saturday, August 1. Extremely dry conditions in conjunction with current and expected weather forecasts have elevated the potential risk of wildfire throughout the area.

This temporary ban prohibits all campfires, even in developed sites and in campfire rings. Smoking is also prohibited, except in vehicles, trailers, and buildings.

Campfires in Developed Sites Now Prohibited

A campfire ban will go into effect across the Willamette National Forest on Saturday, August 1. Extremely dry conditions in conjunction with current and expected weather forecasts have elevated the potential risk of wildfire throughout the area.

This temporary ban prohibits all campfires, even in developed sites and in campfire rings. Smoking is also prohibited, except in vehicles, trailers, and buildings.

Co9unty Parks logoDue to the high risk of fire in the area, Fire Chief Terry Ney of Lane Fire Authority has issued an emergency order that affects all Fern Ridge parks (Richardson Park, Orchard Point Park, Perkins Peninsula Park and Zumwalt Park), Camp Lane, Howard Buford Recreation Area (Mt. Pisgah), Hendricks Bridge Park and Armitage Park.

Cascade winnersFlorenz Knauer, Francisco Mancebo and Dion Smith at the finish line awards ceremony. Mancebo (Canyon Bicycles) and Kristin Armstrong (Twenty 16-ShoAir) won the men’s and women’s opening stage respectively of the five-day Cascade Cycling Classic on Wednesday.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.