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Lane County Search and Rescue deployed to Search for Fallen Climber - Middle Sister

THE HISTORIC MCKENZIE PASS HIGHWAY CLOSES FOR THE SEASON

McKENZIE BRIDGE - With 6 inches of snow already accumulated on McKenzie Pass Highway and another 8-10 inches expected through Friday, the Oregon Department of Transportation will close Oregon 242 for the season as of 9 a.m. today.

Built in the mid-1930s, the highway became a seasonal scenic highway in the 1960s with the completion of the Clear Lake-Belknap Springs section of OR 126.

EWEB logoUtilities warn customers about latest scam
The Eugene Water & Electric Board is warning customers to be wary of a new type of phone scam that is targeting utility customers throughout the Northwest.

McKenzie River Golf CourseLANE COUNTY HEARINGS OFFICIAL
Thursday, November 13, 9:30 a.m., Customer Service Center (CSC), 3050 N. Delta Hwy., Eugene OR
Agenda:

CulvertSALEM: Officials are saying taxpayers and native fish will both benefit under a new culvert repair pilot program agreed upon by the Oregon departments of Transportation and Fish and Wildlife, and recently approved by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission.
The three-year pilot program will make it easier for ODOT to make short-term repairs to culverts within its highway system. In return for including site-specific improvements in fish passage at each site, ODOT will receive a temporary reprieve from the state’s fish passage requirements that often involve more extensive repairs to provide full passage to native migratory fish.

 

 

FINN ROCK: “I’ve been trying to emphasize the idea of public relations and relationship building,” was the way Jim Thomas explained his work as the new McKenzie Schools superintendent. Speaking at last week’s meeting of the school board, he encouraged the district to again work on developing a strategic plan. Referring to past experiences with similar exercises, Thomas said, “By the time you’re done with it the local community is involved and it becomes like a living document. I’d like to throw it out just to get your input.”
Board member Alyssa Brownlee said she’d had some experience with the strategic planning process when she worked at Clark College. “Initially there was a lot of anticipation and resistance,” she recalled. “I myself was thinking about another thing to do, more papers to fill out. After we went through the process I actually found it was kind of fun. Having clear goals that we all worked on was really helpful,” she added.
Referring to the school’s previous strategic plan, board member Kathy Keable said that it has lain dormant in part because it had occurred at a “rather tumultuous time for the district.” Keable felt the study, conducted with the Planning, Public Policy and Management  program at the University of Oregon, “Was a start but we didn’t keep it going and really look at it to make changes. It should be something that’s ours and not theirs.” (Click title to continue)

MeetingRAINBOW: People had a chance to place some priorities on places that matter to them last Wednesday night. They did it by marking up maps to show which U.S. Forest Service roads they use and what sort of special places they feel are along those routes.
“You should mark the areas that you appreciate - maybe because you work up there,” explained Matt Peterson, assistant  recreation  officer for the Willamette Forest. Using comment sheets linked to the marked up maps, people were also encouraged to list some of their thoughts on why those areas are important, what they do there and what sort of road management would be appropriate.

 

Hazards for travelers come with high winds

The forecast could bring dangerous driving to the Oregon Coast and Willamette Valley

Golf courseWALTERVILLE: A plan that could have led to the redevelopment the McKenzie River Golf Course as a 27-home subdivision was rejected by Lane County last week. The decision by county planning director Matt Laird took into account current zoning, which would have allowed the 59-acre parcel to be divided up as 2-acre lots, but called into question how that could occur in an area identified as a flood zone.
 Besides conforming to the allowable lot sizes, the plan also wouldn’t have conflicted with transportation patterns in the neighborhood and the placement of utilities. The development would have conformed to the county’s riparian code for structural setbacks from Class 1 streams while also proposing the construction of bio swales, “rain gardens,” and other retention devices to collect storm water and allow it to percolate underground before flowing into the river.

Lane Electric logo11:30 p.m. Saturday night, October 18, until approximately 8:30 a.m., Sunday morning, October 19

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.