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Excerpts  From the October 10, 2013 Sheriff’s Reports

Sept. 27: 8:15 AM: Traffic Complaint – Mp. 17, Marcola Rd. Caller is concerned because 2 teenage boys wearing dark clothing and orange vests are holding signs asking drivers to slow down. Caller is concerned they are “not official.” They advised they are slowing traffic down for a truck delivery. Unable to dispatch.

5:28: At about 11:30 p.m. Trooper Boyd, with Deputy Combs (LCSO) riding, contacted a camp in the USFS Saddle Dam Campground on Blue River Reservoir after hearing a verbal dispute. Deputy Combs received consent to search the female who showed signs of meth use and seized two baggies of methamphetamine from her. Boyd contacted the male and noticed a 12 – 14”+ Douglas fir tree nearby that had been cut down recently. The male suspect indicated tat the tree was in his way when he attempted to park his vehicle.

UnicyclesMCKENZIE BRIDGE: When does riding a bicycle across the U.S. sound like kicking back? After you’ve done it on one wheel. That’s the opinion of 41-year-old Dustin Kelm after traveling uphill and downhill over 3,347 miles in 92 days.

Gypsy moth trapThe Oregon Dept. of Agriculture’s insect management traps, like this one hanging from a tree branch at the Leaburg Boat Landing this summer, have been closely monitored.

The Oregon Dept. of Agriculture reports it has been another relatively quiet year for gypsy moth detections, but the discovery of two moths in a single trap near Grants Pass has caught their attention.

BLM meetingLEABURG: Area residents had a chance to hear about the Bureau of Land Management’s plans for logging near Vida at a public meeting last Thursday. Agency staffers with backgrounds ranging from fish biologists to silviculurists explained some of the reasoning for tree removal on up to 2,000 acres on both sides of the McKenzie River.
How that might impact the local community was a concern for many of the people in the room.

Sahalie FallsUsually, when a major wildfire destroys a large forested area in a seasonal zone, snow tends to accumulate at a greater level in the burned area than in adjacent forests. But a new study found that the snowpack melts much quicker in charred areas, potentially changing the seasonal runoff pattern of rivers and streams.
The study by Oregon State University researchers, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, documented a 40 percent reduction of albedo – or reflectivity – of snow in the burned forest during snowmelt, and a 60 percent increase in solar radiation reaching the snow surface.

LRAPA logoTomorrow, October 1st, marks the first day of the open/backyard burning season for most residents in Lane County.

EWEB meetingLEABURG: Eugene Water & Electric Board chairman John Simpson made the case last Tuesday for why the utility was considering shedding some 3,000 of its McKenzie area customers. ”It’s not about making money. It’s about creating better internal savings over the long term,” he said.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.