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High-water mark of Oregon’s postwar-timber-era culture

Pixie kitchen

 

 

 

 

By Finn J.D. John
It goes without saying that Oregon has changed in the 50 years that have gone by since the Tom McCall era.
People who remember Oregon in 1967 look back on a sort of Edenic place, comfortably conservative in some ways and progressive in others; a place with plentiful good-paying jobs and high levels of public services and low taxes and excellent roads, all paid for by a booming timber industry.
It went away, of course, when the mills started mechanizing and the available logging projects dwindled, starting in the mid-1970s. But while it lasted, it was a real and distinctive regional culture.
To get a sense of that culture (or, for those of us who have been here long enough, to remember it), there’s really no better refresher than Pixieland.

Outdoor burning date pushed back to October 7th due to fire danger

The fall outdoor burning season is expected to open on Saturday, Oct. 7 for many Lane County residents. The season, originally set to start Oct. 1, has been delayed a week.

Private fish farm’s bid was $575,000 more than ODFW’s

Desert Hatchery

 

 

 

 

A private central Oregon trout farm received a $1.3 million annual contract to grow trout that eventually will be planted in the Willamette River basin. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers awarded the contract September 15 to Desert Springs Trout Farm in Summer Lake.
Previously, the trout had been produced at the Leaburg Hatchery on the McKenzie River. Owned by the Corps, but operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the hatchery produced rainbow and cutthroat trout, as well as summer steelhead, as mitigation for losses due to Willamette River basin dams. Trout production at the Leaburg Hatchery is being phased out by the end of next year.
Corps officials said it had determined that trout mitigation could be done through a supply contract, such as those recently signed with ODFW, and that it does not need to operate a hatchery to acquire fish.

Over the last 11 days the Lane County Sheriff’s Office has been assigning extra patrols to the McKenzie Bridge community due to the fire activity.  This provided a law enforcement presence in areas that do not routinely see p

Back in school? Get ready for changes

“Young adventurers” laid groundwork for tourism

Hand up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIDA: “About 1914 something kind of magical happened,” according to Randy Dersham, president of the McKenzie River Drift Boat Museum. The magic came about when log trucks replaced river drives as the most economical way of getting timber to sawmills combined with the creation of a graded road that drew recreationists up from Eugene who wanted to fish a pristine river.
“The young men that were log drivers in the homesteads around here at the time started to guide around 1920,” Randy told the gathering at last Saturday’s Eugene Symphony fundraiser.
The young entrepreneurs soon found the “Old Scow” design used to corral heavy logs wasn’t all that maneuverable when it came to avoiding rocks and rapids in fast water.
Credited with the first major advance in boat design was John West who opted for a wider craft that could seat two people side-by-side. Built out of fairly thick 3/4 inch boards and weighing around 500 lbs. It wasn’t a lightweight, except in comparison to the “Old Scows.”

A privilege and a blessing

Mary Sherman

BLUE RIVER: Mary Sherman, well-respected family nurse practitioner at the McKenzie River Clinic, will be retiring at the end of August. Mary has practiced medicine at the Clinic almost since its beginning. The Clinic opened its doors in March, 1977, and Mary came to work three years later, in 1980.
Mary was among the first nurse practitioners licensed in Oregon, after earning her Master’s in Nursing from the University of Washington. At the time, many people didn’t understand the exact role of family nurse practitioners in the medical system. Now, it’s well known that family nurse practitioners provide full primary care and are a valuable asset to the health care system.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.