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Ranald McDonaldBy Finn J.D. John
The two Scottish gentlemen must have cut very strange figures on the gritty streets of the New York City waterfront in 1843, poking their carefully groomed heads into every darksome Bowery flophouse and shanghai joint in the Big Apple’s notorious maritime underworld.
But Duncan Finlayson and Archibald McDonald were desperate. They were looking for McDonald’s son, Ranald. The future of the Oregon territory depended on it. Unless they could find the young man, Oregon would almost certainly be lost to the British crown.

Tuesday, September 30, 11:55: Erik Larsen, a 28-year-old man from North Bend, Oregon, was located in the Three Sisters Wilderness east of Obsidian Falls after taking a short hike off trail without his pack and becoming disoriented. He called 911 around noon on 9/30/14 requesting assistance as he was becoming cold and wet. 3 Deschutes County mounted posse and 7 ground search and rescue volunteers assisted Lane Counties 6 mountain rescue volunteers with locating Larsen. His location was established by using his cell phone.

Salmon netFocus on man’s reintroduction of fish

Hatchery populations of spring chinook salmon in the subbasins of the upper Willamette River are genetically similar to the wild populations in these basins and should continue to be used for recovery of spring chinook salmon.
That’s the conclusion of a study published in July by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife researchers. The research had been identified as high priority by the 2008 Willamette Project biological opinion. Spring chinook salmon of the upper Willamette River basin were first listed in 1999 as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, a label that had been reaffirmed in 2005 and again in 2010.

Bannock IndiansBy Finn J.D. John
Nearly every Oregonian knows a story or two about Bigfoot - the legendary and elusive ape-creature that supposedly lives deep in the wilderness and serves as an inspiration to crypto-zoologists and bad reality TV producers nationwide. More than a few Oregonians have claimed to have seen the elusive fellow - or, at least, to know somebody who has.

Dave walpLEABURG: Last Saturday’s Salmon Celebration at the McKenzie Hatchery provided a number of opportunities for people to learn about the complex ecosystem in the area. Booths at the celebration covered topics ranging from macroinvertebrate identification or water quality, to riparian ecology, as well as an opportunity to view salmon spawning.
Dave Walp had a popular display featuring the pelts of a good number of the animals that populate the McKenzie Valley and the surrounding high country.

 

 

 

 

Another great week of McKenzie Athletics has passed with the High School
Volleyball team taking down Alsea, Triangle Lake and Amity. Our football
team fell to Mapleton but showed much improvement as they prepare to
start their regular season schedule this week against North Douglas.
The Volleyball team will host Mapleton on Tuesday then Travel to
Eddyville on Thursday. The real excitement will be on Saturday when we
host the 3rd Annual RPI Volleyball Tournament. This tournament includes

LRAPA logoThe backyard burning ban has been extended until October 15th, 2014 with provision for additional delays until further notice. With the extended dry and hot conditions the Lane County area has experienced, it has continued to keep fire danger levels in the “High” to “Extreme” ranges.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.