vegetables

Oregon's BountyStrawberries, squash, asparagus,  and salad greens — not to mention a vast array of bedding plants, flowering baskets, and fresh-cut flowers — are just a few favorites of the agricultural bounty of spring. But if people want to buy directly from the source, where do you go?  
“Everyone knows where their local farmers market is. But what about farm stands, u-pick fields, and on-farm festivals out in rural areas? That’s where Oregon’s Bounty comes in,” said the Oregon Farm Bureaus Communications Director Anne Marie Moss.  
Oregon’s Bounty website at oregonfb.org is a searchable directory of over 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

OnionsBy Kym Pokorny

Get onions in the ground in spring and avoid heartbreak when it comes time to harvest big, beautiful bulbs this summer.

Plant as soon as the soil is dry enough to work, said Jim Myers, a plant breeder at Oregon State University. March and April are prime times.

Most onions grown in Oregon are long-day onions. They make top, green growth until a critical day length is reached, which triggers bulbing. That generally begins at about 14 hours of light per day.

If you plant onions in early spring, they’ll grow to fairly large plants by the time daylight reaches 14 hours. Large bulbs result. However, if you wait to plant until the end of April when days are already 14 hours long, bulbing will begin immediately and you’ll have small pearl onions.

Cherry DropsBy Kym Pokorny

Once a week from June 14 to mid-September, Harry Olson and Tobie Habeck commuted from Salem to Silverton to tend a U-shaped plot at The Oregon Garden. As they weeded and watered, the duo would hear docents tell their trams full of visitors about the little-known grafted vegetables overflowing from the raised beds and spilling onto the mulched aisles.

WateringBy Tiffany Woods
Ross Penhallegon, a horticulturist with the Oregon State University Extension Service, recommends watering during the early morning hours. That's because there is usually less wind to affect the soaker hose, drip or sprinkler pattern. Plus, the temperatures are lower in the early morning, meaning more water gets into the soil and doesn't evaporate.

 

OSU tomatoesBy Denise Ruttan
As you pore over seed catalogs in these cold winter months, you'll likely include tomatoes in your vegetable garden dreams.
Oregon State University's vegetable breeding program has developed several varieties over the past 40 years that are now mainstays in many Pacific Northwest gardens.

Tomato plants can have problemsTomatoes can have a variety of problems, including leaf roll, late blight and blossom end rot. Photo by Lynn Ketchum.

 

By Tiffany Woods

McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.