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Gypsy moth trapThe Oregon Dept. of Agriculture’s insect management traps, like this one hanging from a tree branch at the Leaburg Boat Landing this summer, have been closely monitored.

The Oregon Dept. of Agriculture reports it has been another relatively quiet year for gypsy moth detections, but the discovery of two moths in a single trap near Grants Pass has caught their attention.

BLM meetingLEABURG: Area residents had a chance to hear about the Bureau of Land Management’s plans for logging near Vida at a public meeting last Thursday. Agency staffers with backgrounds ranging from fish biologists to silviculurists explained some of the reasoning for tree removal on up to 2,000 acres on both sides of the McKenzie River.
How that might impact the local community was a concern for many of the people in the room.

Sahalie FallsUsually, when a major wildfire destroys a large forested area in a seasonal zone, snow tends to accumulate at a greater level in the burned area than in adjacent forests. But a new study found that the snowpack melts much quicker in charred areas, potentially changing the seasonal runoff pattern of rivers and streams.
The study by Oregon State University researchers, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, documented a 40 percent reduction of albedo – or reflectivity – of snow in the burned forest during snowmelt, and a 60 percent increase in solar radiation reaching the snow surface.

Walterville MarketWALTERVILLE: “This was an 11th hour save for our store,” according to Jerry Swartz, commenting on new ownership for the 13,000 square foot grocery in the Walterville Shopping Center. Only a month ago, the Brookings based C&K Market chain had announced plans to lock the doors to the store on September 8th, saying it wasn’t profitable. That deadline has passed without a shutdown, thanks to brothers Don and Lai Sidhu, who arranged to take over on September 23rd.

Vida logging mapLEABURG: The Bureau of Land Management will host a meeting on Thursday to review possible logging near Vida. Up for discussion will be up to 2,060 acres in the McKenzie Landscape Project area.
According to BLM staffers, in 1994 the Northwest Forest Plan established adaptive management areas (AMAs) to test new methods of achieving resource and conservation goals.

High algae levels found at Walterville Pond in Lane County

Walterville PondA health advisory is being issued today due to high levels of blue-green algae in Walterville Pond, located off Oregon Route 126, five miles east of Springfield. The pond is adjacent to the Eugene Water & Electric Board (EWEB) Walterville Power Canal, a half-mile northeast of Walterville.
Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae that can produce toxins. These algae levels are likely associated with dangerous cyanotoxin concentrations in the water that can be harmful to humans and animals.

Inside bridgeReprinted from the August 28, 2013, Douglas County News
By Ted Romus

MYRTLE CREEK: The 3rd Annual Dinner on the Horse Creek Covered Bridge was held last Saturday evening in Myrtle Creek to another sold out crowd of 90 people, the maximum capacity for the historic bridge originally built in 1930 to span Horse Creek in the vicinity of McKenzie Bridge in Lane County.

 

 

'37 ChevyOrganizers of this year’s McKenzie Art Festival report it was a big success. According to the Emerald Art Center, “This festival had the best turn-out to this date and will continue to grow every year.

Chainsaw sculptor Kevin StrauslinA Northwest Rendezvous in Blue River? The three-day McKenzie River Chainsaw Festival certainly fit the bill – filling the air with the sound of racing two stroke saw engines and plenty of chips and sawdust.
For Randy Gauthier of Moberly Lake, British Columbia, it almost didn’t happen. The single parent father is new to the trade. After working for 23 years as a dangerous tree faller he began carving only six months ago, deciding he had to find a better way to spend some time with his son.

 

Juvenile salmon“Spatial diversity” in the first year of life can protect an entire salmon species from the effects of large-scale forces such as climate change and the operation of hydroelectric dams, according to a new NOAA Fisheries research article published last week.
The researchers liken species’ prospects to that of financial investment portfolios, which balance risk.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.